F O O T P R I N T Z

NAMASTE MY FRIENDS! I JUST CAME BACK FROM ULTRA MUSIC FESTIVAL IN MIAMI, AND THIS BAND WAS ONE OF MY BEST NEW DISCOVERIES! ADDY AND MAURICE LIVE IN MONTREAL AND MAKE ‘ANTI-POP POP MUSIC’- THEIR SOUNDS ARE PRETTY AMAZING, TO UNDERSELL IT. YOU CAN LISTEN  HERE!

I HAD THE CHANCE TO LISTEN TO THEM PLAYING GOLDEN DREAMS LIVE AT THE SHELBORNE, AND ALSO CHAT WITH THEM, AND THEY ARE REALY  TALENTED AND FRESH! FIND THEM, RESEARCH THEM, AND LISTEN TO THEM, AND THEN WRITE ME BECAUSE I AM SURE THEIR SOUNDS WILL PROVOKE FOREIGN FEELINGS, AND A DESIRE TO FLOAT!

 

Addy Weitzman e Maurice Knecht

 

Tell us something more about you, how were the Footprintz born? What are the Footprintz?

A) We met when we were fifteen at Sona afterhours club in Montreal while Tiga was djing. We only became friends a few years later when we started playing music together and learnt that we shared common interests, like writing about the changing seasons, the personality of Leonard Cohen, and the acting of Peter Sellers. When we successfully covered the song Bike by Syd Barrett we knew we were onto something really special.

M) To escape the everyday routine of school, work, and reality, Addy and I used to spend many hazy moonlight nights downtown Montreal singing acapella songs to beautiful strangers. Many times narrowly avoiding unnecessarily violent responses, but sometimes, when the harmonies were smooth, delicate smiles blossomed from hazy face painted evening druids.

Why “Footprintz”?

A) We felt the name was relative to the times, with global warming and all. Also, it’s a reference to an obscure band from the 80′s who made an album that we think is a masterpiece.

M) Because I like this girl and her smile is more melt-worthy than the global warming. Also because of what Addy said, I’ll second that… I’d wrestle a polar bear in sparkling chains to see her smile at me again.

Your sound is particular, it differs from what most of the public is accustomed to hearing. What about your musical training?

A) My musical training has mostly been an exploration of “Visual Music” – notably “Parallel Stone Graphs”, where one sees not only harmony and rhythm, at an extensive pace, but also the viking trilogy, known to many as the “Vortex Grapevine”. I never ‘played’ instruments very well though, if that’s what you’re asking.

M) Most of my musical training formed while I was living in New York with my mom. My mom used to blast
Abba songs, over bottles of quality foreign wine, and sing along that had all the remnants of growing up in Brooklyn and chasing topsy turvy dreams. The rest ofmy training stems from a beautiful man with a dangerous moustache who runs a local Irish pub in my neighbourhood. He has paid me, over the years, in beer and angry looks to play experimental folk music for some pretty rough crowds which has permanently calloused my soul.

How is working with the Visionquest?

A) Let me put it to you this way, if it weren’t for Visionquest, there’s a very good chance we might not be alive right now.

M) Asking what it’s like to work with Visionquest is like when Douglas Adams asked what is the meaning of
life. It’s like being teleported into an Italo Calvino novel while sipping on Courvoisier with Marvin Gaye
at an18th century French Brothel.

Addy Weitzman e Maurice Knecht

 


Is there a particular idea behind the EP “Utopia”?

A) We came up with the idea of a Utopia ep after both reading the novels “Island” and “The Doors of Perception” by Aldous Huxley. The idea of impossibility, chance, and really an endless search for perfection and beauty that we sometimes experience moments of, are what we often talk about and hopefully express in music.

M) Basically there is a girl who recently died her hair haystack morning sunlight blonde who has charmingly been on my mind… As for Utopia, it is a celebration of our favourite ideas and romanticisms. Among having many varied musical tastes individually, we are both diehard fans of Italo, music and the magical bands that such places as
Sheffield and Manchester procured. It’s also an excuse for us to paint our faces and make obscure, anti-pop pop
music.

What can you tell us about “Golden dreams”? How was it born?

A) Actually it’s kind of ironic, because the birth of Golden Dreams occurred after I was nearly killed in a cooking fire, deep frying chicken wings. The heatwave in Montreal at the time was so unbearable and the studio sessions were going so horribly, that I decided to take a day off and go to a lake-house, that’s been in my family fpr generations, in the countryside with a few friends. Somehow by the chance of some kind of higher being my friends and I survived and the house didn’t burn down. When I returned to the studio after this catastrophe, we wrote Golden Dreams.

M) Similar situation as when making Utopia, broke, hungry, confused and had a very small
window of time to work. There was a summer heat wave, no air conditioning, in an attic above a small garage with a hundred blinking machines emitting environmentally embarrassing amounts of energy. We were there for 16 hours a night, every night for two weeks. The result somehow through all the exhaustion, madness, and possible hallucinations, was Golden Dreams.

Softwares and hardwares you used to work on Utopia?

A) We made Utopia with a Juno 106 and a guitar. My parents were away on vacation, we had a small bedroom studio, and we smoked over 500 cigarettes in one week (the majority of smoking done by Maurice).

M) Addy actuall smoked alot more than he pretends to. Our hardware was our brains and software, our hearts. We had one week to work while Addy’s parents were out of town. All I remember from that experience was falling asleep on a couch every night in the same clothes to the nonstop droning of 40’s satellite radio that for some reason we never… never… turned off. We also made a pretty big mess and his parents weren’t too pleased when they got back from their trip.

 

Do you have projects you’re working on, or maybe a tour that stops in Rome :) ?

A) The projects we work on are generally experiments that involve extensive research and are usually strictly confidential. No dates booked for Rome at the moment, although, if I may, I’d like to quote one of our great mentors – Spaceman – “Rome is the best city in the world”. Drinking Italian wine is also one of my great pastimes.

M) Beside my sercret android, C48-17 that I’ve been working on in my basement, Addy and I are currently working towards our first album with Visionquest which we’re really excited about. As for Rome, to quote the Godfather, “In Italy, women are more dangerous then shotguns”. That’s motivation! Also, one of my preferred deserts happens to be a short espresso accompanied with panettone and heavenly joy.

Thanks guys! Hope to see you in Rome!

A) If only the police in Canada dressed as well as they did in Italy…

M) Thanks for the Interview. Visionquest is harbouring an open and fresh philosophy as a label of open mindedness that everyone on board shares and is exciting to be a part of. Getting Ewan Pearson on board, including his remix, completely brought the Utopia EP to a magical place it would have never gone otherwise. As long as the planet’s magnetic fields don’t make any sudden gigantic sommersaults we’ll hopefully continue progressing and make it out to Italy too.

cheers!

VIA: POSTED ON SOUNDWALL AND WRITTEN BY JACOPO VILLANACCI.

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